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Table 2 Determinants of job stickiness

From: The paradox of falling job satisfaction with rising job stickiness in the German nursing workforce between 1990 and 2013

  (1) (2) (3)
  Full specification No interaction Joint estimation
   Baseline 1991–2003 Interaction 2004–2013
Age −0.002* −0.003 0.002
  (0.001) (0.002) (0.003)
Female −0.044* −0.040 0.004
  (0.023) (0.032) (0.043)
Married 0.007 0.011 0.003
  (0.024) (0.038) (0.046)
Years of education −0.001 −0.000 −0.005
  (0.006) (0.009) (0.013)
Wages/1 000 0.005*** 0.003** 0.002
  (0.001) (0.001) (0.002)
Household income/1 000 −0.004 0.005 −0.014
  (0.009) (0.013) (0.017)
No. of children in household 0.031*** 0.033** −0.004
  (0.011) (0.014) (0.018)
No. of doctor visits −0.002*** −0.003*** 0.002*
  (0.001) (0.001) (0.001)
Years in the company 0.005*** 0.003* 0.003
  (0.001) (0.002) (0.002)
Work hours (actual) −0.001 −0.000 −0.002
  (0.001) (0.002) (0.002)
Work hours (overtime) 0.001 0.002 −0.004*
  (0.001) (0.002) (0.002)
Constant 0.982*** 0.968*** −0.217
  (0.123) (0.167) (0.224)
State controls Yes Yes
Year controls Yes Yes
N 3 670 3 670
adj. R 2 0.057 0.063
  1. Note: Model (1) uses pooled data from all waves and without time interaction variables. Column (2) shows the coefficients of the variables when interaction terms are included. Column (3) shows the interaction coefficients. Heteroscedastic robust standard errors clustered on the individual level are in parentheses.
  2. *p < 0.1, **p < 0.05, ***p < 0.01